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A longitudinal analysis of factors associated with post traumatic growth after acquired brain injury.

Authors
  • Igoe, Anna1
  • Twomey, Deirdre M1
  • Allen, Niamh2
  • Carton, Simone3
  • Brady, Nuala1
  • O'Keeffe, Fiadhnait1, 2, 3
  • 1 University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. , (Ireland)
  • 2 Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. , (Ireland)
  • 3 National Rehabilitation Hospital, Dun Laoghaire, Ireland. , (Ireland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2024
Volume
34
Issue
3
Pages
430–452
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09602011.2023.2195190
PMID: 37022203
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

ABSTRACTPost-Traumatic Growth (PTG) is a form of positive psychological change that occurs for some individuals following traumatic experiences. High levels of PTG have been reported among survivors of acquired brain injury (ABI). Yet it remains unclear why some survivors of ABI develop PTG and others do not. The present study investigated early and late factors that are associated with long-term PTG in people with moderate to severe ABIs. Participants (n = 32, Mage = 50.59, SD = 12.28) completed self-report outcome measures at two time-points seven years apart (one-year and eight-years post-ABI). Outcome measures assessed emotional distress, coping, quality of life and ongoing symptoms of brain injury, as well as PTG at the later timepoint. Multiple regression analyses indicated that one-year post-ABI, fewer symptoms of depression, more symptoms of anxiety, and use of adaptive coping strategies accounted for a significant amount of variance in later PTG. At eight years post-ABI, fewer symptoms of depression, fewer ongoing symptoms of brain injury, better psychological quality of life and use of adaptive coping strategies explained a substantial amount of variance in PTG. For individuals with ABIs, PTG may be promoted by implementing long-term neuropsychological support which aims to facilitate use of adaptive coping strategies, supports psychological wellbeing and allows individuals to find meaning post-ABI.

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