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Long Noncoding RNAs in the Pathogenesis of Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Carcinoma.

Authors
  • Abraham, John M1
  • Meltzer, Stephen J2
  • 1 Department of Medicine/Gastroenterology Division and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287.
  • 2 Department of Medicine/Gastroenterology Division and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gastroenterology
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2017
Volume
153
Issue
1
Pages
27–34
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1053/j.gastro.2017.04.046
PMID: 28528706
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

For many years, only a small fraction of the human genome was believed to regulate cell function and development. This protein-coding portion composed only 1% to 2% of 3 billion human DNA base pairs-the remaining sequence was classified as junk DNA. Subsequent research has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed into a broad array of noncoding RNAs, ranging in size from microRNA (20-23 nucleotides) to long noncoding RNA (lncRNA, more than 200 nucleotides). These noncoding RNA classes have been shown to use diverse molecular mechanisms to control gene expression and organ system development. As anticipated, alterations in this large control system can contribute to disease pathogenesis and carcinogenesis. We review the involvement of noncoding RNAs, lncRNAs in particular, in development of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal carcinoma. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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