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Locally relevant food-based recommendations could increase iron and calcium intake for adolescent girls in Vietnam.

Authors
  • Gie, Simone Michelle1
  • Nguyen, Phuong Hong2, 3
  • Bergeron, Gilles4
  • Tran, Lan Mai5
  • Hoang, Nga Thu6
  • Knight, Frances1, 7
  • 1 Nutrition Division, United Nations World Food Programme, Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 2 International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, DC, USA.
  • 3 Thai Nguyen University of Pharmacy and Medicine, Thai Nguyen City, Vietnam.
  • 4 The New York Academy of Sciences, New York, New York, USA.
  • 5 Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. , (Georgia)
  • 6 National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam.
  • 7 London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2023
Volume
1527
Issue
1
Pages
97–106
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/nyas.15036
PMID: 37414089
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Unhealthy eating habits are common among adolescents in Vietnam, where transitioning food environments increasingly offer energy-dense micronutrient-poor foods. Successful behavior change approaches must be feasible and acceptable, promoting local foods that are available, accessible, and preferred. Yet, few studies have investigated the potential of food-based approaches for adolescents. We used linear programming to identify problem nutrients, local nutrient sources, and realistic food-based recommendations (FBRs) to improve nutrient intake among girls 16-22 years in Thai Nguyen, Vietnam. We then identified a reduced set of FBRs to prioritize the most critical micronutrient gaps. Calcium and iron targets could not be met in any realistic diet modeling scenario. The best set of FBRs included seven recommendations which could meet intake targets for 9 of 11 modeled micronutrients. The best reduced set of three FBRs targeting iron and calcium only-although more feasible for behavior change-was less effective at improving intake of these nutrients since fewer foods were recommended. Given the difficulty of meeting calcium and iron targets using local foods within acceptable dietary patterns, additional interventions, such as supplementation, staple food fortification, or increasing the availability of affordable calcium- and iron-rich foods, may be necessary to promote dietary adequacy for adolescent girls. © 2023 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

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