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Localization of alkaline phosphatase in three gram-negative rumen bacteria.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of bacteriology
Publication Date
Volume
116
Issue
1
Pages
424–440
Identifiers
PMID: 4147649
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Of the three species (Bacteroides ruminicola, B. succinogenes, and Megasphaera elsdenii) of anaerobic gram-negative rumen bacteria studied, only B. ruminicola produced significant amounts of alkaline phosphatase. This enzyme, which is constitutive, showed a greater affinity for p-nitrophenylphosphate than for sodium-beta-glycerophosphate and was shown to be located exclusively in the periplasmic space of log-phase cells. Small amounts of this enzyme were released from these cells in stationary-phase cultures, but washing in 0.01 M MgCl(2) and the production of spheroplasts by using lysozyme in 0.01 M MgCl(2) did not release significant amounts of the enzyme. Exposure to 0.2 M MgCl(2) did not release significant amounts of the periplasmic alkaline phosphatase of the cell, and when these cells were spheroplasted with lysozyme in 0.2 M MgCl(2) only 25% of the enzyme was released. Spheroplasts were formed spontaneously in aging cultures of B. ruminicola, but even these cells retained most of their periplasmic alkaline phosphatase. It was concluded that the alkaline phosphatase of B. ruminicola is firmly bound to a structural component within the periplasmic area of the cell wall and that the enzyme is released in large amounts only when the cells break down. The behavior of alkaline phosphatase in this bacterium contrasts with that of conventional periplasmic enzymes of aerobic bacteria, which are released upon conversion into spheroplasts by lysozyme and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and by other types of cell wall damage. All three species of bacteria studied here, as well as bacteria found in mixed populations in the rumen, have thick, complex layers external to the double-track layer of their cell walls. In addition, B. ruminicola produces a loose extracellular material.

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