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Is local or central adiposity more strongly associated with incident knee osteoarthritis than the body mass index in men or women?

Authors
  • Culvenor, A G1
  • Felson, D T2
  • Wirth, W3
  • Dannhauer, T4
  • Eckstein, F5
  • 1 Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Salzburg, Austria; La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Austria)
  • 2 Clinical Epidemiology Research & Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; The University of Manchester and Central Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 3 Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Austria)
  • 4 Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Austria)
  • 5 Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Austria)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
May 25, 2018
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.joca.2018.05.006
PMID: 29772342
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Although both central (WHtR) and peripheral (SCF and IMF) adiposity were significantly associated with incident RKOA, neither was more strongly associated with incident RKOA than BMI. The simple measure of BMI appears sufficient to capture the elevated risk of RKOA associated with greater amounts of localised adiposity.

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