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Liver immunity and glutathione.

Authors
  • Yamauchi, A
  • Tsuyuki, S
  • Inamoto, T
  • Yamaoka, Y
Type
Published Article
Journal
Antioxidants and Redox Signaling
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1999
Volume
1
Issue
2
Pages
245–253
Identifiers
PMID: 11228752
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Redox processes have been implicated in various biologic processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, and cell proliferation, and several molecules have been identified as redox regulators in cell activation. Glutathione is the oldest and most investigated molecule among them. Although details of the mechanisms by which glutathione regulates various aspects of cell biology remains to be characterized, the relationship between immunodeficiency and cellular glutathione status is well established. Redox dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques have, on the average, significantly decreased plasma cysteine and intracellular glutathione levels. Liver contains abundant levels of reducing factors. However, glutathione levels in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of cirrhosis patients are lower compared to values detected in healthy individuals. In the present article, the significance of glutathione in regulating the functions of lymphocytes, especially those of liver-associated lymphocytes, has been described. A novel strategy for immune therapy of liver neoplasms with the use of redox-modulating agents has been proposed.

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