Affordable Access

Access to the full text

A Little Dab Will Do: A Case of Cannabis-Induced Psychosis

Authors
  • Rossi, Garrett1
  • Beck, Melanie2
  • 1 Psychiatry, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, USA
  • 2 Psychiatry, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, USA
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cureus
Publisher
Cureus
Publication Date
Sep 08, 2020
Volume
12
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.7759/cureus.10311
PMID: 33052273
PMCID: PMC7544610
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green
External links

Abstract

A patient presented to the emergency department with his brother due to recent onset of paranoid behavior that escalated over the past month. The patient endorsed paranoid delusions of people watching him and following him in a black truck. The patient admitted to being unable to sleep for the past two weeks and to having hypervigilant behavior whenever he leaves the house. Due to the patient’s presentation, the differential diagnosis included schizophrenia, substance-induced psychotic disorder, psychotic disorder due to another medical condition, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder with mood incongruent psychotic features. Upon interview, the patient stated he was using marijuana to decrease his self-reported anxiety and other social stressors since the age of 13 years. Over the past month, the patient says he has been “dabbing,” which is a highly concentrated form of cannabis mainly consumed by experienced users. These “dabs” have an extremely high tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content (up to 80%), which is the main psychoactive component in cannabis products. Since the patient began using this potent form of cannabis, he has had increasing difficulty functioning at work and worsening symptoms of psychosis. After eliciting this information and noting the patient had a positive urine drug screen for cannabis, a diagnosis of cannabis-induced psychosis along with severe cannabis use disorder was made. There is a trend towards increasing THC concentrations in cannabis products. This case highlights the importance of being aware of these highly potent cannabis products and their potential harms. Patients should approach these products with caution, as they are not only more dangerous to manufacture but also have the potential to induce psychosis in susceptible populations. 

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times