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Lipidomic analysis of meibomian gland secretions from the tree shrew: Identification of candidate tear lipids critical for reducing evaporation.

Authors
  • Chen, Jianzhong1
  • Panthi, Shyam2
  • 1 Department of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 35294, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 35294, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Chemistry and physics of lipids
Publication Date
May 01, 2019
Volume
220
Pages
36–48
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.chemphyslip.2019.01.003
PMID: 30660743
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Lipids secreted from the meibomian glands form the outermost layer of the tear film and reduce its evaporation. Abnormal changes in the quantities or compositions of lipids present in meibomian gland secretions (meibum) are known to lead to dry eye disease, although the underlying mechanism is not yet well understood. The tree shrew is the non-primate mammal most closely related to humans. To assess the utility of the tree shrew as a model for the study of dry eye disease, we analyzed the lipid profile of tree shrew meibum using an untargeted ESI-MS and MS/MSall shotgun approach. The resulting lipidome shared many similarities with human meibum, while displaying some interesting differences. For example, several classes of lipids, including wax esters, cholesteryl esters, diesters, and (O-acyl)-ω-hydroxy fatty acids, had relatively longer chain lengths in tree shrew meibum. These increases in length may promote more effective reduction of tear evaporation in the tree shrew, which likely underlies the much longer blinking interval of this mammal. Our results suggest that the tree shrew could be an effective model for the study of dry eye. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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