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Lipid-mediated resistance of Gram-negative bacteria against various pore-forming antimicrobial peptides.

Authors
  • Gutsmann, Thomas
  • Hagge, Sven O
  • David, Alexander
  • Roes, Stefanie
  • Böhling, Arne
  • Hammer, Malte U
  • Seydel, Ulrich
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Endotoxin Research
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2005
Volume
11
Issue
3
Pages
167–173
Identifiers
PMID: 15949145
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) play a dual role as target and as effector molecules. The knowledge of the LPS-induced activation of human immune cells is increasing; however, surprisingly, much less effort seems to be directed towards the understanding of the mechanisms leading to the killing of the bacterial organisms, which eventually results in the release of LPS from the bacterial surface into the blood circulation. We demonstrate mechanisms of interaction of peptides of the innate immune system (e.g. defensins and cathelicidins) as well as of externally administered antibiotics (e.g. Polymyxin B) with Gram-negative bacteria. The main focus is directed on data derived from electrical measurements on a reconstitution system of the outer membrane as an asymmetric bilayer composed on one side of LPS and on the other of phospholipids. All these antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are membrane-active and induce the permeabilization of the reconstituted membranes by the formation of lesions. We found that differences in the activity of the AMPs against various sensitive and resistant Gram-negative bacteria can be explained solely by variations in the chemical structure of LPS, e.g. in the composition of the sugar head group. A reduction of the net negative charge of LPS is responsible for a reduced interaction with the polycationic AMPs and thus for resistance. A most important side effect of positively charged AMPs is the neutralization of the negatively charged LPS released from the bacterial surface as a consequence of AMP-induced killing.

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