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Life situation, coping and quality of life in people with high and low risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Authors
  • Axelman, Karin
  • Lannfelt, Lars
  • Almkvist, Ove
  • Carlsson, Marianne
Type
Published Article
Journal
Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2003
Volume
16
Issue
4
Pages
220–228
Identifiers
PMID: 14512717
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The psychosocial consequences of being at different risk for inheriting Alzheimer's disease (AD) were investigated in a high-risk group (n = 106) and a low-risk group (n = 37). Non-affected individuals from families with AD in two or more generations answered questions about their life situation, quality of life and coping. Their answers were compared with a population sample (n = 408). The high-risk group assessed the quality of their personal relationships and everyday life higher than did the population sample. They also used less emotive and supportive coping strategies compared with the population sample. Nearly 90% in the high-risk group felt anxiety concerning their own risk or the risk of their children and grandchildren of developing AD. About 50% of the respondents complained about a lack of information. The pieces of information they asked for were early signs of the disease, treatment, and practical information on how to handle everyday life with an affected relative.

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