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Lessons from bright-spots for advancing knowledge exchange at the interface of marine science and policy.

Authors
  • Karcher, Denis B1
  • Cvitanovic, Christopher2
  • van Putten, Ingrid E3
  • Colvin, Rebecca M4
  • Armitage, Derek5
  • Aswani, Shankar6
  • Ballesteros, Marta7
  • Ban, Natalie C8
  • Barragán-Paladines, María José9
  • Bednarek, Angela10
  • Bell, Johann D11
  • Brooks, Cassandra M12
  • Daw, Tim M13
  • de la Cruz-Modino, Raquel14
  • Francis, Tessa B15
  • Fulton, Elizabeth A3
  • Hobday, Alistair J3
  • Holcer, Draško16
  • Hudson, Charlotte17
  • Jennerjahn, Tim C18
  • And 17 more
  • 1 Australian National Centre for the Public Awareness of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 2 Australian National Centre for the Public Awareness of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 CSIRO, Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Centre for Marine Socioecology, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University, ACT, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 5 School of Environment, Resources and Sustainability, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 6 Department of Anthropology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa; Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science (DIFS), Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 7 Fisheries Socioeconomic Department, Centro Tecnológico del Mar- Fundación CETMAR, Vigo, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 8 School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 5C2, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 9 Charles Darwin Research Station, Charles Darwin Foundation, Galápagos, Ecuador. , (Ecuador)
  • 10 Evidence Project, Research and Science, The Pew Charitable Trusts, Washington, DC, United States. , (United States)
  • 11 Center for Oceans, Conservation International, Arlington, VA, USA; Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 12 Department of Environmental Studies, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, United States. , (United States)
  • 13 Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Kräftriket 2B, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 14 Instituto de Investigación Social y Turismo, Universidad de La Laguna, San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 15 Puget Sound Institute, University of Washington Tacoma, Tacoma, WA, USA.
  • 16 Croatian Natural History Museum, Zagreb, Croatia; Blue World Institute of Marine Research and Conservation, Veli Lošinj, Croatia. , (Croatia)
  • 17 Lenfest Ocean Program, The Pew Charitable Trusts, Washington, DC, United States. , (United States)
  • 18 Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research, Fahrenheitstrasse 6, Bremen, Germany; Faculty of Geoscience, University of Bremen, Klagenfurter Strasse, Bremen, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 19 Norwegian College of Fishery Science, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 20 Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 21 Fishing Ecology, Management and Economics Group, Department of Ecology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 22 Blue World Institute of Marine Research and Conservation, Veli Lošinj, Croatia; Institute for Tourism, Zagreb, Croatia. , (Croatia)
  • 23 School of Biological and Marine Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, PL4 8AA, UK.
  • 24 Vanuatu Fisheries Department, Port Vila, Vanuatu. , (Vanuatu)
  • 25 Gund Institute for Environment, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 05405, USA.
  • 26 Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 8a, Utrecht, CB 3584, the Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 27 Centre for Marine Socioecology, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 28 Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), 0579, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 29 Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 30 Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research, Fahrenheitstrasse 6, Bremen, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 31 California Ocean Science Trust, Sacramento, CA, 95814, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Environmental Management
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Apr 19, 2022
Volume
314
Pages
114994–114994
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2022.114994
PMID: 35452885
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Evidence-informed decision-making is in increasing demand given growing pressures on marine environments. A way to facilitate this is by knowledge exchange among marine scientists and decision-makers. While many barriers are reported in the literature, there are also examples whereby research has successfully informed marine decision-making (i.e., 'bright-spots'). Here, we identify and analyze 25 bright-spots from a wide range of marine fields, contexts, and locations to provide insights into how to improve knowledge exchange at the interface of marine science and policy. Through qualitative surveys we investigate what initiated the bright-spots, their goals, and approaches to knowledge exchange. We also seek to identify what outcomes/impacts have been achieved, the enablers of success, and what lessons can be learnt to guide future knowledge exchange efforts. Results show that a diversity of approaches were used for knowledge exchange, from consultative engagement to genuine knowledge co-production. We show that diverse successes at the interface of marine science and policy are achievable and include impacts on policy, people, and governance. Such successes were enabled by factors related to the actors, processes, support, context, and timing. For example, the importance of involving diverse actors and managing positive relationships is a key lesson for success. However, enabling routine success will require: 1) transforming the ways in which we train scientists to include a greater focus on interpersonal skills, 2) institutionalizing and supporting knowledge exchange activities in organizational agendas, 3) conceptualizing and implementing broader research impact metrics, and 4) transforming funding mechanisms to focus on need-based interventions, impact planning, and an acknowledgement of the required time and effort that underpin knowledge exchange activities. Copyright © 2022 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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