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Leptospirosis in three workers on a dairy farm with unvaccinated cattle.

Authors
  • Benschop, Jackie1
  • Collins-Emerson, Julie2
  • Maskill, Allie3
  • O'Connor, Patrick4
  • Tunbridge, Margaret5
  • Yupiana, Yuni6
  • Weston, Jenny7
  • 1 Co-Director and Senior Lecturer, Molecular Epidemiology and Public Health Laboratory, Institute of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North and Global Leptospirosis Environmental Action Network.
  • 2 Laboratory Manager and Senior Research Officer, Molecular Epidemiology and Public Health Laboratory, Institute of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North.
  • 3 General Practitioner, Bulls Medical Centre, Bulls.
  • 4 Medical Officer of Health, Whanganui Public Health, MidCentral District Health Board, Whanganui.
  • 5 Health Protection Officer, Whanganui Public Health, MidCentral District Health Board, Whanganui.
  • 6 PhD Candidate, EpiCentre, Institute of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North.
  • 7 Dean of Veterinary Sciences, Institute of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The New Zealand medical journal
Publication Date
Sep 22, 2017
Volume
130
Issue
1462
Pages
102–108
Identifiers
PMID: 28934773
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The utility of PCR testing for Leptospira DNA as both an early and rapid test for leptospirosis was demonstrated. Two of three cases reported persistence of symptoms at least six months after the acute episode and one of these remains unable to work. Risk mitigation measures such as post-exposure prophylaxis, animal vaccination, heightened clinical suspicion of leptospirosis and recognition of context specific risk factors (eg, effluent spreading) demonstrate the value of medical and veterinary experts working together.

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