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Lepidopteran species have a variety of defence strategies against bacterial infections.

Authors
  • Mikonranta, Lauri1
  • Dickel, Franziska2
  • Mappes, Johanna2
  • Freitak, Dalial3
  • 1 Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Finland)
  • 2 Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland. , (Finland)
  • 3 Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland; Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. , (Finland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Feb 02, 2017
Volume
144
Pages
88–96
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jip.2017.01.012
PMID: 28163013
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The insect immune system has versatile ways of coping with microbial insults. Currently, innate immune priming has been described in several invertebrates, and the first insights into its mechanistic basis have been described. Here we studied infections with two different strains of Serratia marcescens bacteria in two different Lepidopteran hosts. The results reveal fundamental differences between the two hosts, a well-known model organism Galleria mellonella and a non-model species Arctia plantaginis. They differ in their strategies for resisting oral infections; priming their defences against a recurring sepsis; and upregulating immunity related genes as a response to the specific pathogen strains. The two bacterial strains (an environmental isolate and an entomopathogenic isolate) differ in their virulence, use of extracellular proteases, survival in the larval gut, and in the immune response they evoke in the hosts. This study explores the potential mechanistic explanations for both host and pathogen specific characters that significantly affect the outcome of Gram-negative bacterial infection in Lepidopteran larvae. The results highlight the need to pay greater attention to the differences between model and non-model hosts, and closely related pathogen strains, in immunological studies.

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