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Left ventricular mass in childhood dilated cardiomyopathy: a possible predictor for selection of patients for cardiac transplantation.

Authors
  • Kimball, T R1
  • Daniels, S R
  • Meyer, R A
  • Schwartz, D C
  • Kaplan, S
  • 1 Division of Cardiology, Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH 45229.
Type
Published Article
Journal
American Heart Journal
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jul 01, 1991
Volume
122
Issue
1 Pt 1
Pages
126–131
Identifiers
PMID: 1829567
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

To determine the relationship of left ventricular hypertrophy (as assessed by mass) to symptoms and cardiac function in chronic childhood dilated cardiomyopathy, 17 long-term survivors (12 asymptomatic, 5 symptomatic) were studied at a median follow-up of 6.25 years (1.25 to 16.8 years). Left ventricular mass, dimension, wall stress, and contractility (relationship between velocity of circumferential fiber shortening and end-systolic wall stress) were assessed by echocardiography. These data were compared to measurements at the onset of disease. At follow-up, mass decreased significantly from the onset in the asymptomatic patients but remained elevated in the symptomatic patients (101 +/- 35 gm/m2 to 54 +/- 12 gm/m2, p = 0.001; 122 +/- 55 gm/m2 to 198 +/- 115 gm/m2, p = 0.23, respectively). Shortening fraction and contractility were both significantly lower in the symptomatic group compared with the asymptomatic group at follow-up (shortening fraction = 21 +/- 7% vs 29 +/- 5%, p = 0.02; contractility = -0.24 +/- 0.14 circ/sec vs -0.05 +/- 0.11 circ/sec, p = 0.01). Follow-up wall stress was slightly higher in symptomatic patients compared with asymptomatic patients. Three symptomatic patients had progressive hypertrophy and either died or required transplantation. Higher left ventricular mass is associated with the presence of symptoms, depressed contractility, and slightly higher wall stress. Persistence or progression of hypertrophy may be a poor prognostic sign in survivors of childhood dilated cardiomyopathy. Measurement of mass may be useful to indicate the necessity for closer follow-up to select patients for cardiac transplantation before hemodynamic decompensation.

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