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Lead content in edible wild mushrooms in northwest Spain as indicator of environmental contamination.

Authors
  • 1
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology
Publication Date
Volume
34
Issue
4
Pages
330–335
Identifiers
PMID: 9543501
Source
Medline

Abstract

Lead content was determined in wild growing mushrooms collected from two different areas in the Province of Lugo (NW Spain). It has been analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry in 95 samples of 13 species (7 mycorrhizals and 6 saprophites). In an assessment of lead concentrations, the following factors have been considered: species and ecology, morphological portion, and traffic pollution. The average lead concentration of the samples was 1 ppm dry weight (dw). Saprophite species presented higher levels than mycorrhizal ones (< 1 ppm), Coprinus comatus reaching the maximum mean concentration with 2.06 and 2.79 ppm of dw in the hymenophore and the rest of the fruit body. Morphological portion, statistically, did not show significant difference between the two portions; however, Macrolepiota procera always presented lead high levels in the hymenophore in all samples. The effect due to traffic pollution has been specially observed in Coprinus comatus, presenting the highest concentration with values of 6.51 and 10.43 ppm, respectively, in samples collected in the city center. This species, as other researchers have indicated, could be considered as an indicator by lead contamination. The contribution of mushrooms to the weekly intake of lead was calculated and the possible health risk for the consumer is pointed out. These data are of great importance in view of toxicology and partly environmental protection.

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