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Lay-Based Morbidity Profiles of Sugar Cane Workers: Testing a New Method Using Free Lists.

Authors
  • Coronel-Sánchez, Víctor H1, 2
  • Álvarez-Pabón, Yelitza1, 2
  • Esteban, Laura Y1, 2
  • Vargas-Valero, Óscar1, 2
  • Omaña, Jhon J1, 2
  • Idrovo, Alvaro J3
  • 1 School of Medicine, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia. , (Colombia)
  • 2 Student Researchers Society of the Universidad Industrial de Santander (SEIMED), Bucaramanga, Colombia. , (Colombia)
  • 3 Public Health Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Carrera 32 #29-31, Bucaramanga, Santander, Colombia. [email protected] , (Colombia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The journal of primary prevention
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2020
Volume
41
Issue
1
Pages
39–49
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10935-019-00575-y
PMID: 31919765
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Epidemiological profiles are key elements in preventive medicine and public health planning activities. There are no standard methods to identify these profiles. We explored the epidemiological profile of sugar cane workers in the municipality of Ginebra (Valle del Cauca, Colombia) using free lists of municipal morbidity data. We administered an instrument to 30 sugar cane workers, 15 health care workers and 15 people from the general community in order to compare the health problems experienced by the community. Sugar cane workers reported their own health problems and health professionals and community members served as informants for health problems in the general community. Respiratory problems were part of the morbidity profile of all groups evaluated, flu was part of the profile of the general community, and other respiratory problems were part of the profile of sugar cane workers and health personnel. Musculoskeletal problems were predominant only for sugar cane workers, and we found differences between the health problems expressed by the community and those reported by health personnel. The free lists method constitutes a quick, efficient, and useful tool to develop an approximation of an epidemiological profile and is easily interpreted, especially when typical and previously described occupational diseases are considered together with diseases associated with occupational groups. Epidemiological profiles based on free lists are useful to identify new opportunities for prevention strategies.

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