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A large-scale dynamo and magnetoturbulence in rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae.

Authors
  • Mösta, Philipp1, 2
  • Ott, Christian D1
  • Radice, David1
  • Roberts, Luke F1
  • Schnetter, Erik3, 4, 5
  • Haas, Roland6
  • 1 TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA.
  • 2 Department of Astronomy, 501 Campbell Hall #3411, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
  • 3 Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 4 Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 5 Center for Computation &Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70803, USA.
  • 6 Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam-Golm, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nature
Publisher
Springer Nature
Publication Date
Dec 17, 2015
Volume
528
Issue
7582
Pages
376–379
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1038/nature15755
PMID: 26618868
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is important in many high-energy astrophysical systems, where instabilities can amplify the local magnetic field over very short timescales. Specifically, the magnetorotational instability and dynamo action have been suggested as a mechanism for the growth of magnetar-strength magnetic fields (of 10(15) gauss and above) and for powering the explosion of a rotating massive star. Such stars are candidate progenitors of type Ic-bl hypernovae, which make up all supernovae that are connected to long γ-ray bursts. The magnetorotational instability has been studied with local high-resolution shearing-box simulations in three dimensions, and with global two-dimensional simulations, but it is not known whether turbulence driven by this instability can result in the creation of a large-scale, ordered and dynamically relevant field. Here we report results from global, three-dimensional, general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. We show that hydromagnetic turbulence in rapidly rotating protoneutron stars produces an inverse cascade of energy. We find a large-scale, ordered toroidal field that is consistent with the formation of bipolar magnetorotationally driven outflows. Our results demonstrate that rapidly rotating massive stars are plausible progenitors for both type Ic-bl supernovae and long γ-ray bursts, and provide a viable mechanism for the formation of magnetars. Moreover, our findings suggest that rapidly rotating massive stars might lie behind potentially magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae.

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