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A Large Mammalian Model of Myocardial Regeneration After Myocardial Infarction in Fetal Sheep.

Authors
  • Hodges, Maggie M1
  • Zgheib, Carlos1
  • Liechty, Kenneth W1
  • 1 Laboratory for Fetal and Regenerative Biology, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Advances in wound care
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
10
Issue
4
Pages
174–190
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/wound.2018.0894
PMID: 32496979
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objective: Ischemic heart disease accounts for over 20% of all deaths worldwide. As the global population faces a rising burden of chronic diseases, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes, the prevalence of heart failure due to ischemic heart disease is estimated to increase. We sought to develop a model that may more accurately identify therapeutic targets to mitigate the development of heart failure following myocardial infarction (MI). Approach: Having utilized fetal large mammalian models of scarless wound healing, we proposed a fetal ovine model of myocardial regeneration after MI. Results: Use of this model has identified critical pathways in the mammalian response to MI, which are differentially activated in the regenerative, fetal mammalian response to MI when compared to the reparative, scar-forming, adult mammalian response to MI. Innovation: While the foundation of myocardial regeneration research has been built on zebrafish and rodent models, effective therapies derived from these disease models have been lacking; therefore, we sought to develop a more representative ovine model of myocardial regeneration after MI to improve the identification of therapeutic targets designed to mitigate the development of heart failure following MI. Conclusions: To develop therapies aimed at mitigating this rising burden of disease, it is critical that the animal models we utilize closely reflect the physiology and pathology we observe in human disease. We encourage use of this ovine large mammalian model to facilitate identification of therapies designed to mitigate the growing burden of heart failure.

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