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Lactobacillus: host-microbe relationships.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current topics in microbiology and immunology
0070-217X
Publication Date
Volume
358
Pages
119–154
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/82_2011_187
PMID: 22102141
Source
Medline

Abstract

Lactobacilli are a subdominant component of the human intestinal microbiota that are also found in other body sites, certain foods, and nutrient-rich niches in the free environment. They represent the types of microorganisms that mammalian immune systems have learned not to react to, which is recognized as a potential driving force in the evolution of the human immune system. Co-evolution of lactobacilli and animals provides a rational basis to postulate an association with health benefits. To further complicate a description of their host interactions, lactobacilli may rarely cause opportunistic infections in compromised subjects. In this review, we focus primarily on human-Lactobacillus interactions. We overview the microbiological complexity of this extraordinarily diverse genus, we describe where lactobacilli are found in or on humans, what responses their presence elicits, and what microbial interaction and effector molecules have been identified. The rare cases of Lactobacillus septicaemia are explained in terms of the host impairment required for such an outcome. We discuss possibilities for exploitation of lactobacilli for therapeutic delivery and mucosal vaccination.

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