Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

L-Alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine can be cytoprotective or cytotoxic in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes: a double-edged sword phenomenon.

Authors
  • Tuboly, Eszter1
  • Gáspár, Renáta2
  • Ibor, Miguel Olias2
  • Gömöri, Kamilla2, 3
  • Kiss, Bernadett4
  • Strifler, Gerda1
  • Hartmann, Petra1
  • Ferdinandy, Péter4, 3
  • Bartekova, Monika5, 6
  • Boros, Mihály1
  • Görbe, Anikó7, 8, 9
  • 1 Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Surgical Research, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 2 Cardiovascular Research Group, Department of Biochemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 3 Pharmahungary Group, Szeged, Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 4 Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 5 Centre of Experimental Medicine, Institute for Heart Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia. , (Slovakia)
  • 6 Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Physiology, Comenius University in Bratislava, Bratislava, Slovakia. , (Slovakia)
  • 7 Cardiovascular Research Group, Department of Biochemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. [email protected] , (Hungary)
  • 8 Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. [email protected] , (Hungary)
  • 9 Pharmahungary Group, Szeged, Hungary. [email protected] , (Hungary)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
460
Issue
1-2
Pages
195–203
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11010-019-03580-1
PMID: 31280435
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

L-Alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC) is a widely used food supplement. GPC has been shown to exert beneficial effects in several organs; however, the cardiac effects of GPC have yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was therefore to map out the effects of GPC on cardiac myocytes, with or without ischemia-reperfusion insult. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes were treated with GPC at 1, 10, 80, and 100 µM concentrations for 15 min, 3 h, or 24 h, respectively. Cell viability by calcein assay and the degree of oxidative stress by DHE (superoxide level) and H2DCF (total ROS accumulation) staining were measured. In separate experiments, cardiomyocytes were pre-treated with the optimal concentration of GPC for 3 h and then cells were exposed to 4 h of simulated ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion (SI/R). Cell viability was measured at the end of the SI/R protocol. In normoxic conditions, the 15-min and the 3-h GPC treatment did not affect cell viability, total ROS, and superoxide levels. Under SI/R conditions, the 3-h GPC treatment protected the cardiac myocytes from SI/R-induced cell death and did not alter the level of oxidative stress. The 24-h GPC treatment in normoxic conditions resulted in significant cell death and increased oxidative stress at each concentration. Here we provide the first evidence for the cytoprotective effect of short-term GPC treatment. However, long-term administration of GPC may exert cytotoxicity in a wide concentration range in cardiac myocytes. These results may draw attention to a comprehensive cardiac safety protocol for the testing of GPC.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times