Klebsiella pneumoniae Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to Bacterial Parotitis: A Case Report

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Klebsiella pneumoniae Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to Bacterial Parotitis: A Case Report

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Case Reports in Medicine
Publisher
Ashdin Publishing
Volume
4
Pages
1–3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.4303/jcrm/235934
Source
Ashdin
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant infection that spreads along the fascial planes, causing subcutaneous tissue death characterized by rapid progression and systemic toxicity. Dental infection is the most common nidus of cervical necrotizing fasciitis. Strep-tococcus and Staphylococcus species are found to be the most commonly isolated organisms in many bacteriological analyses of cervical necrotizing fasciitis. We describe a case of a 29-year-old female who was diagnosed with acute suppurative parotitis first. After admission, her illness progressed to cervical necrotizing fasciitis. She underwent surgery of incision and drainage, and pus culture yielded Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). To the best of our knowledge, cervi-cal necrotizing fasciitis is seldom secondary to bacterial parotitis, and rarely caused by K. pneumoniae.

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