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The Kidney–Gut–Muscle Axis in End-Stage Renal Disease is Similarly Represented in Older Adults

Authors
  • Lustgarten, Michael S.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutrients
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Dec 30, 2019
Volume
12
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/nu12010106
PMID: 31905970
PMCID: PMC7019845
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Decreased renal function, elevated circulating levels of urea, intestinal levels of urea-degrading bacteria, and gut-derived uremic metabolites are present in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a cohort that has reduced muscle mass and physical function, and poor muscle composition. This phenotype, defined as the kidney–gut–muscle axis, is similarly represented in older adults that do not have ESRD. The purpose of this short communication is to illuminate these findings, and to propose a strategy that can positively impact the kidney–gut–muscle axis. For example, dietary fiber is fermented by intestinal bacteria, thereby producing the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, propionate, and butyrate, which affect each component of the kidney–gut–muscle axis. Accordingly, a high-fiber diet may be an important approach for improving the kidney–gut–muscle axis in ESRD and in older adults that do not have ESRD.

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