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Japan and the European Union: shared foreign policy interests

Authors
  • Reiterer, Michael1
  • 1 Delegation of the European Commission to Japan, Europa House, 9–15 SanbanchoChiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075, Japan , Tokyo (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Asia Europe Journal
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 13, 2006
Volume
4
Issue
3
Pages
333–349
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10308-006-0075-1
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

BackgroundJapan and the European Union (Reiterer (2004b) 2:33–42) are both interested in enhancing their international standing in order to overcome their perceived status as economic giants but political dwarfs. While the reasons for this endeavour as well as the inherent characteristics of the actors involved—a traditional nation state as compared to the most advanced integration structure world-wide—are quite different, both entities see themselves primarily as civilian powers (Whitman (2006) 11(1):1–15) without neglecting the need to endow themselves with a military capacity in order to be more effective and credible on a world-wide scale. The ‘EU is emerging as a key regional actor in certain global affairs, particularly in such areas as finance, trade, environment and development, and current policy is directed towards enhancing the role of the European Union in the global governance system. To this end, the European Commission is actively engaged in such issues as the global governance of trade, the protection of human rights, the promotion of democracy, strengthening of regional and global security communities, and encouraging regional integration in other parts of the world.’ (Farrel (2005) 10(4):452–453)—all areas, except the latter task, where the EU and Japan could potentially cooperate closely.ObjectivesBefore identifying shared foreign policy interests between the EU and Japan, I will first bring to light some of the interests the EU has in East Asia in general; secondly I will chart the major Japanese foreign policy interests which will allow me to map out areas of potential common interest and concern.

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