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Transcriptome Analysis of Alcohol Drinking in Non-Dependent and Dependent Mice Following Repeated Cycles of Forced Swim Stress Exposure.

Authors
  • Farris, Sean P1, 2
  • Tiwari, Gayatri R3
  • Ponomareva, Olga3
  • Lopez, Marcelo F4
  • Mayfield, R Dayne3, 5
  • Becker, Howard C4, 6, 7
  • 1 Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.
  • 2 Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15206, USA.
  • 3 Waggoner Center for Alcohol and Addiction Research, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.
  • 4 Charleston Alcohol Research Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 28425, USA.
  • 5 Department of Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.
  • 6 Department of Neuroscience, Medical University of South, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
  • 7 Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC 20401, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brain Sciences
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
May 02, 2020
Volume
10
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/brainsci10050275
PMID: 32370184
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Chronic stress is a known contributing factor to the development of drug and alcohol addiction. Animal models have previously shown that repeated forced swim stress promotes escalated alcohol consumption in dependent animals. To investigate the underlying molecular adaptations associated with stress and chronic alcohol exposure, RNA-sequencing and bioinformatics analyses were conducted on the prefrontal cortex (CTX) of male C57BL/6J mice that were behaviorally tested for either non-dependent alcohol consumption (CTL), chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor dependent alcohol consumption, repeated bouts of forced swim stress alone (FSS), and chronic intermittent ethanol with forced swim stress (CIE + FSS). Brain tissue from each group was collected at 0-h, 72-h, and 168-h following the final test to determine long-lasting molecular changes associated with maladaptive behavior. Our results demonstrate unique temporal patterns and persistent changes in coordinately regulated gene expression systems with respect to the tested behavioral group. For example, increased expression of genes involved in "transmitter-gated ion channel activity" was only determined for CIE + FSS. Overall, our results provide a summary of transcriptomic adaptations across time within the CTX that are relevant to understanding the neurobiology of chronic alcohol exposure and stress.

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