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IPEC-1 variable immune response to different serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica.

Authors
  • Berri, Mustapha1
  • Hogan, Daniel2
  • Saade, Georges2
  • Roche, Sylvie1
  • Velge, Philippe1
  • Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle1
  • Meurens, François3
  • 1 ISP, INRAE, Université François Rabelais de Tours, UMR 1282, 37380, Nouzilly, France. , (France)
  • 2 BIOEPAR, INRAE, Oniris, 44307, Nantes, France. , (France)
  • 3 BIOEPAR, INRAE, Oniris, 44307, Nantes, France. Electronic address: [email protected] , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Veterinary immunology and immunopathology
Publication Date
Dec 02, 2019
Volume
220
Pages
109989–109989
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.vetimm.2019.109989
PMID: 31841890
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Salmonella is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family causing various illnesses. The ability of the different serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica to infect a host and to induce pathology relies in part on their cellular and molecular interactions with the intestinal epithelium. In the current study, an in vitro approach using non-polarized or polarized IPEC-1 porcine intestinal epithelial cells were used in order to assess the relation between adhesion, invasion, and induction of the immune response as a function of the serotype of Salmonella. Five serovars, Choleraesuis (host-adapted), Typhimurium (ubiquitous), Typhisuis (host-restricted), which are relevant for pig infection, and Dublin and Gallinarum, which are host-restricted or host-adapted, were studied. A strong variation was observed in the percentages of adhesion and invasion amongst the S. enterica serovars used to interact with the non-polarized and polarized cells. Subsequently, differences were identified between serovars in terms of immune response induced. Serovars Typhimurium and Typhisuis induced a strong innate immune response four and half hours after the beginning of cell stimulation while Choleraesuis, Gallinarum, and Dublin did not. A strong inflammatory response could limit the spread of the porcine serovars to the gut while, with a weak response, bacteria may not be constrained by the immune response enabling severe systemic diseases. Different repertoires of adhesion factors and of secreted protein effectors between Salmonella serovars interacting with IPEC-1 cells probably explains the differences in their early pathogenic behaviours. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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