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Involvement of host cell heparan sulfate proteoglycan in Trypanosoma cruzi amastigote attachment and invasion.

Authors
  • Bambino-Medeiros, R1
  • Oliveira, F O R
  • Calvet, C M
  • Vicente, D
  • Toma, L
  • Krieger, M A
  • Meirelles, M N
  • Pereira, M C S
  • 1 Laboratório de Ultra-estrutura Celular, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz/FIOCRUZ, Av Brasil 4365, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro 21045-900, Brazil. [email protected] , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Parasitology
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2011
Volume
138
Issue
5
Pages
593–601
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S0031182010001678
PMID: 21269549
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the attachment and invasion process of a variety of intracellular pathogens. We have previously demonstrated that heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) mediate the invasion of trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi in cardiomyocytes. Herein, we analysed whether GAGs are also implicated in amastigote invasion. Competition assays with soluble GAGs revealed that treatment of T. cruzi amastigotes with heparin and heparan sulfate leads to a reduction in the infection ratio, achieving 82% and 65% inhibition of invasion, respectively. Other sulfated GAGs, such as chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate and keratan sulfate, had no effect on the invasion process. In addition, a significant decrease in infection occurred after interaction of amastigotes with GAG-deficient Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, decreasing from 20% and 28% in wild-type CHO cells to 5% and 9% in the mutant cells after 2 h and 4 h of infection, respectively. These findings suggest that amastigote invasion also involves host cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. The knowledge of the mechanism triggered by heparan sulfate-binding T. cruzi proteins may provide new potential candidates for Chagas disease therapy.

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