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Investigation into the Airborne Dissemination of H5N2 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus During the 2015 Spring Outbreaks in the Midwestern United States.

Authors
  • Torremorell, Montserrat1
  • Alonso, Carmen1
  • Davies, Peter R1
  • Raynor, Peter C2
  • Patnayak, Devi3
  • Torchetti, Mia4
  • McCluskey, Brian5
  • 1 A Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Saint Paul, MN, 55108.
  • 2 B Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Saint Paul, MN 55455.
  • 3 C Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • 4 D United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Ames, IA 50010. , (United States)
  • 5 E United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Fort Collins, CO 80526. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Avian Diseases
Publisher
BioOne (American Association of Avian Pathologists)
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2016
Volume
60
Issue
3
Pages
637–643
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1637/11395-021816-Reg.1
PMID: 27610723
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

We investigated the plausibility of aerosol transmission of H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus during the 2015 spring outbreaks that occurred in the U.S. midwest. Air samples were collected inside and outside of infected turkey and layer facilities. Samples were tested to assess HPAI virus concentration (RNA copies/m(3) of air), virus viability, and virus distribution by particle size. HPAI virus RNA was detected inside and up to 1000 m from infected facilities. HPAI virus was isolated from air samples collected inside, immediately outside, up to 70 m from infected facilities, and in aerosol particles larger than 2.1 μm. Direct exposure to exhausted aerosols proved to be a significant source of environmental contamination. These findings demonstrate HPAI virus aerosolization from infected flocks, and that both the transport of infectious aerosolized particles and the deposition of particles on surfaces around infected premises represent a potential risk for the spread of HPAI.

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