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Investigating the associations of age of initiation and other psychosocial factors of singular alcohol, tobacco and marijuana usage on polysubstance use: analysis of a population-based survey in Jamaica.

Authors
  • Lalwani, Kunal1
  • Whitehorne-Smith, Patrice2
  • McLeary, Joni-Gaye3
  • Albarus, Neena4
  • Abel, Wendel3
  • 1 Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, The University of the West Indies, Mona, Saint Andrew, Jamaica [email protected]. , (Jamaica)
  • 2 School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, The University of the West Indies, Mona, Saint Andrew, Jamaica. , (Jamaica)
  • 4 School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMJ Open
Publisher
BMJ
Publication Date
Nov 14, 2023
Volume
13
Issue
11
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2023-076111
PMID: 37963690
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study aimed to examine concurrent polysubstance use of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana and determine correlations with access to marijuana, friend and familial drug use habits, risk perception and the age of initiation associated with the singular use of these substances. A secondary data analysis. Used the Jamaica National Drug Prevalence Survey 2016 dataset. Involved the entire dataset comprising 4623 randomly selected respondents between 12 and 65 years old. Primary outcome: concurrent polysubstance use recorded as using two or more of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana. Predictor variables include risk perception and age of initiation of singular alcohol, tobacco and marijuana use, ease of marijuana access and family and friend alcohol and illegal drug use. Approximately 58%-66% of respondents commenced singular alcohol, tobacco or marijuana use under 17. Participants commencing marijuana use at 11 years and under and between 12 and 17 were 3.346 and 4.560 times more likely to report past month concurrent polysubstance use (p=0.030 and p<0.001). Respondents who did not believe that smoking tobacco sometimes (p=0.049), and smoking marijuana sometimes and often was harmful, had increased odds of concurrent polysubstance use (p=0.047 and p<0.001, respectively). Respondents who indicated access to marijuana as easy were significantly more likely to report past month concurrent polysubstance use compared with those who reported access as difficult (p=0.002). Participants who indicated that friends or family members get drunk and take illegal drugs were associated with 1.722 and 1.864 increased odds of reporting past month concurrent polysubstance use (p=0.004 and p=0.017, respectively). Decreased perceived risk, childhood and adolescent age of initiation and easy access to marijuana were significantly associated with polysubstance use among Jamaicans. The influence of friends and family members' drug and alcohol use behaviours on individuals developing polysubstance use habits further endorses the need for interventions. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2023. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

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