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Invertebrate cytokines. III: Invertebrate interleukin-1-like molecules stimulate phagocytosis by tunicate and echinoderm cells.

Authors
  • Beck, G
  • O'Brien, R F
  • Habicht, G S
  • Stillman, D L
  • Cooper, E L
  • Raftos, D A
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cellular immunology
Publication Date
Feb 01, 1993
Volume
146
Issue
2
Pages
284–299
Identifiers
PMID: 8174171
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Phagocytosis is the predominant defense mechanism of invertebrates. Here we show that phagocytosis by echinoderm bladder amoebocytes and tunicate granular amoebocytes can be enhanced by invertebrate interleukin-1-like molecules. As little as 5 ng/ml of invertebrate interleukin-1 produced a significant stimulation of echinoderm and tunicate amoebocyte phagocytosis. Stimulation of phagocytosis by echinoderm interleukin-1-like molecules was inhibited by antisera to vertebrate interleukin-1. Invertebrate interleukin-1 also acted as an opsonin when preincubated with erythrocytes or yeast. In addition, the cellular mechanisms of invertebrate phagocytosis were studied using pharmacologic agents to inhibit echinoderm amoebocyte phagocytosis. The energy requirements and involvement of cellular cytoskeletal elements in phagocytosis by bladder amoebocytes were similar to those of mammalian macrophages. These results demonstrate a role for interleukin-1 in invertebrate host defense mechanisms.

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