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An Intuitive Risk Communication Tool to Enhance Patient-Provider Partnership in Diabetes Consultation.

Authors
  • Rouyard, Thomas1, 2
  • Leal, José1
  • Salvi, Dario3, 4
  • Baskerville, Richard5
  • Velardo, Carmelo3
  • Gray, Alastair1
  • 1 Nuffield Department of Population Health, Health Economics Research Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • 2 Research Center for Health Policy and Economics, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 3 Department of Engineering Science, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • 4 School of Arts, Culture and Communication, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 5 Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2022
Volume
16
Issue
4
Pages
988–994
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1932296821995800
PMID: 33655766
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This technology report introduces an innovative risk communication tool developed to support providers in communicating diabetes-related risks more intuitively to people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The development process involved three main steps: (1) selecting the content and format of the risk message; (2) developing a digital interface; and (3) assessing the usability and usefulness of the tool with clinicians through validated questionnaires. The tool calculates personalized risk information based on a validated simulation model (United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes Model 2) and delivers it using more intuitive risk formats, such as "effective heart age" to convey cardiovascular risks. Clinicians reported high scores for the usability and usefulness of the tool, making its adoption in routine care promising. Despite increased use of risk calculators in clinical care, this is the first time that such a tool has been developed in the diabetes area. Further studies are needed to confirm the benefits of using this tool on behavioral and health outcomes in T2DM populations.

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