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Intraperitoneal disease dissemination patterns are associated with residual disease, extent of surgery, and molecular subtypes in advanced ovarian cancer.

Authors
  • Torres, Diogo1
  • Kumar, Amanika1
  • Wallace, Sumer K1
  • Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N1
  • Konecny, Gottfried E2
  • Weaver, Amy L3
  • McGree, Michaela E3
  • Goode, Ellen L4
  • Cliby, William A1
  • Wang, Chen5
  • 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States. , (United States)
  • 4 Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States. , (United States)
  • 5 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States; Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gynecologic Oncology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2017
Volume
147
Issue
3
Pages
503–508
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.09.021
PMID: 28964622
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

IP disease dissemination patterns are associated with RD, surgical complexity, and tumor molecular subtypes. Patients with upper abdominal or miliary dissemination patterns are more likely to have mesenchymal HGSOC and in turn achieve lower rates of complete resection. This provides a plausible model for how the biologic behavior of molecular subtypes is manifest in disease and oncologic outcomes.

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