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In-transit metastatic cutaneous melanoma: current management and future directions.

Authors
  • Patel, Ayushi1
  • Carr, Michael J2
  • Sun, James2, 3
  • Zager, Jonathan S4, 5
  • 1 Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B Downs Blvd, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA.
  • 2 Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 10920 North McKinley Drive, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA.
  • 3 Department of Surgery, University Hospitals, Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.
  • 4 Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B Downs Blvd, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA. [email protected]
  • 5 Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 10920 North McKinley Drive, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical & Experimental Metastasis
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2022
Volume
39
Issue
1
Pages
201–211
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10585-021-10100-3
PMID: 33999365
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Management of in-transit melanoma encompasses a variety of possible treatment pathways and modalities. Depending on the location of disease, number of lesions, burden of disease and patient preference and characteristics, some treatments may be more beneficial than others. After full body radiographic staging is performed to rule out metastatic disease, curative therapy may be performed through surgical excision, intraarterial regional perfusion and infusion therapies, intralesional injections, systemic therapies or various combinations of any of these. While wide excision is limited in indication to superficial lesions that are few in number, the other listed therapies may be effective in treating unresectable disease. Where intraarterial perfusion based therapies have been shown to successfully treat extremity disease, injectable therapies can be used in lesions of the head and neck. Although systemic therapies for in-transit melanoma have limited specific data to support their primary use for in-transit disease, there are patients who may not be eligible for any of the other options, and current clinical trials are exploring the use of concurrent and sequential use of regional and systemic therapies with early results suggesting a synergistic benefit for oncologic response and outcomes. © 2021. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V.

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