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[Intranasal glucagon in the treatment of hypoglycemia. A therapeutic possibility in the future].

Authors
  • Carstens, S
  • Andersen, I
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ugeskrift for laeger
Publication Date
Jul 25, 1994
Volume
156
Issue
30
Pages
4339–4342
Identifiers
PMID: 8066934
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Nearly 10% of IDDM patients receiving conventional insulin treatment and about three times as many in intensive insulin therapy yearly experience severe hypoglycaemia (requiring external assistance) The conventional treatment of severe hypoglycaemia is glucagon given intramuscularly by a relative or glucose administered intravenously by a physician. These are however not optimal treatments. Obtaining intravenous access requires a medical doctor and glucagon injection is not always properly done by family members. Glucagon administered intranasally has been proven to raise blood glucose levels in volunteers. The effect of intranasal glucagon on blood glucose is similar to that seen after intramuscular administration for the first 15 minutes following administration. However, intranasal glucagon seems more physiological in that is stabilizes blood glucose concentrations at nearfasting levels, whereas glucagon given intramuscularly tends to give hyperglycaemia. Intranasal glucagon is easy to administer, and can thus prevent serious hypoglycaemic crises and thereby make diabetics and their families more secure.

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