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Intracerebroventricular administration of substance P increases dopamine content in the brain of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuroscience
Publication Date
Volume
95
Issue
1
Pages
113–117
Identifiers
PMID: 10619467
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The interactions existing between substance P- and dopamine-positive neurons, notably in the basal ganglia, suggest that substance P may have therapeutic use in treatment of Parkinson's disease characterized by impaired dopaminergic transmission. The effects of intracerebroventricularly administered substance P were tested on the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum, nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Intracerebroventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine decreased the levels of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in the brain structures under investigation. Administration of substance P in low dose (0.35 nmol/kg) had no effect on the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced reduction of the dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid contents in the brain. However, treatment with substance P in higher dose (3.5 nmol/kg) increased the concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum, nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex relative to saline-treated group. Additionally, 6-hydroxydopamine lesions significantly increased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine and homovanillic acid/dopamine ratios in the striatum and nucleus accumbens. Substance P (3.5 nmol/kg) partially reversed lesion-induced increases in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine and homovanillic acid/dopamine ratios in the striatum, but did not alter these ratios in nucleus accumbens. To test whether substance P fragmentation is responsible for this phenomenon, substance P(5-11), which is one of the main substance P fragments in rat CNS, was administered in equimolar dose. Substance P(5-11) was found to have no effect on the content of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in the striatum and nucleus accumbens. In the frontal cortex, substance P(5-11) produced decreases in dopamine levels and increases in homovanillic acid/dopamine ratio. The results of this study suggest that substance P helps to restore dopamine deficit in the brain in an animal model of Parkinson's disease, with the positive effects being more prominent on the nigrostriatal than on the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, but substance P(5-11) is not responsible for this effect.

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