Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Intra-articular steroid injections in large joint arthritis: A survey of current practice.

Authors
  • Yaghmour, Khaled M1
  • Loumpardias, Georgios A2
  • Elbahi, Amr1
  • M Navaratnam, Devaraj3
  • Boksh, Khalis2
  • Chong, Han Hong2
  • Eastley, Nicholas2, 4
  • 1 Division of Trauma & Orthopaedics Surgery, Kettering General Hospital, Kettering, UK.
  • 2 Division of Trauma & Orthopaedics Surgery, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK.
  • 3 Division of Trauma & Orthopaedics Surgery, Pilgrim Hospital, Boston, UK.
  • 4 University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Musculoskeletal care
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2022
Volume
20
Issue
2
Pages
349–353
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/msc.1596
PMID: 34694056
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Intra-articular corticosteroid injections are widely used as a management modality for mild large joint osteoarthritis (OA). In contrast, there is little guidance or consensus on the use of steroids in moderate to severe disease. The aim of this study is to explore the current practice of surgeons in relation to the use of therapeutic intra-articular steroid injections in patients awaiting large joint arthroplasty for OA. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to consultants performing large joint arthroplasty in four National Health Service Trusts. Participants were questioned on their use of intra-articular therapeutic steroid injections in patients listed for elbow, shoulder, hip or knee arthroplasty. Data was collected over 6 months and analysed using Microsoft Excel. A total of 42 surgeons were included in the study with the majority performing lower limb arthroplasty (73%). About 21 (50%) surgeons indicated they would perform injections in the patient group of interest. Two would perform an unlimited number of injections, whilst the remainder would perform between one and three injections. Respondents most commonly indicated they would tell patients that an injection would provide between 6 and 12 weeks of benefit (14 of 39 surgeons, 36%). Most injecting surgeons (88%) leave 4 months between an injection and subsequent arthroplasty due to increased risk of infection if surgery is performed sooner. This study demonstrates variation in practice in the use of intra-articular steroids in the analysed patient group, and the way surgeons council their patients. National or specialist society guidelines may help to reduce this variation in practice. © 2021 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times