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Intestinal parasites in Kampuchea, Takeo Province.

Authors
  • Giboda, M
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of hygiene, epidemiology, microbiology, and immunology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1985
Volume
29
Issue
4
Pages
377–386
Identifiers
PMID: 4086816
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Fresh stool samples obtained from 1407 adult patients who sought treatment in Takeo province hospital and 332 Takeo preschool and school-age children from 3 to 18 years of age were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites using the technique of native preparation and the flotation method of Faust with subsequent staining with Lugol solution to demonstrate cysts. In hospital patients, a total of 13 protozoan and 9 helminth species were diagnosed. The prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica (cysts and trophozoites) was highest in the age group 15-18 years (18.3%), the peak prevalence of Gairdia lamblia (27.6%) occurred in children of the age group 6-9 years. The highest frequency distribution of Pentatrichomonas hominis (20.1%) was recorded in 3 to 5 years old, that of Enteromonas hominis (12.8%) in 6 to 9 years old. The predominant helminth was Ancylostoma duodenale, with the peak prevalence (65.2%) in patients older than 18 years, followed by Ascaris lumbricoides and Strongyloides stercoralis. Almost half of children patients under 6 was infected with at least two species of parasites, patients over 6 were infected simultaneously with two or more intestinal parasites in an absolute majority of cases. In Takeo preschool and school children the spectrum of diagnosed protozoan and helminth species was somewhat narrower than seen in hospital patients, but their prevalence rates were higher, except for the flagellate Pentatrichomonas hominis. The highest prevalence rates recorded were for E. histolytica 29.5% (age category 10-14 years), for G. lamblia 34.8% (age category 6-9 years), for P. hominis 19.3% (age category 3-5 years), for E. hominis 10.5% (age category 3-5 years), for A. duodenale 85.9% (age category 15-18 years), for A. lumbricoides 26.1% (age category 6-9 years), and for S. stercoralis 18.8% (age category 6-9 years). As many as 70% of children at the age between 6 and 15 years were simultaneously infected with two or three species of intestinal parasites.

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