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Interweaving the public and the private: women's responses to population policy shifts in Singapore.

Authors
  • Teo, P
  • Yeoh, B S
Type
Published Article
Journal
International journal of population geography : IJPG
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1999
Volume
5
Issue
2
Pages
79–96
Identifiers
PMID: 12319731
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study examined perceptions of the impacts of the antinatalist (OPP) and pronatalist (NPP) policies in Singapore. Data were obtained from a sample of 209 men and 280 women under 45 years old who lived in Ang Mo Kio New Town in the center of the island. Findings indicate that 53.4% of women said that fertility decisions were joint ones. 50% of women and 65% of men said that family size was jointly determined. Over 70% were aware of the OPP "stop at 2" policy. Those who gave accurate, detailed knowledge were mostly over 35 years old. Knowledge of OPP did not vary by education, but did vary by awareness of incentives and disincentives. 45.4% of women believed that OPP was a necessary state policy; 25.4% did not. 36.4% thought that OPP was fair; 28.3% did not. 60.3% of women said that OPP did influence family size in society, but 63.8% said it did not influence their individual family size. Finances, education, and child care were explanatory factors in individual planning. OPP is viewed as a successful policy not because of ideology, but because of the value placed on improved socioeconomic standards. 58.2% of women and 55.5% of men knew the details about the NPP. 51.9% of women said the NPP would encourage larger family size, but 87.8% said it would not affect them personally. Findings suggest that personal freedoms and public ideology are not binary, public-private concepts in fertility decision making.

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