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Interphotoreceptor matrix components in retinal cell transplants.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Experimental eye research
Publication Date
Volume
58
Issue
5
Pages
615–621
Identifiers
PMID: 7925699
Source
Medline

Abstract

To further investigate the functional potential of retinal transplants we have used immunocytochemistry to study the distribution of four different interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM)-specific components in rabbit retinal transplants. The different components were: interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP), chondroitin-6-sulfate, F22 antigen and peanut agglutinin (PNA) binding structures. IRBP acts as a retinoid-transport protein between the neural retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. Chondroitin-6-sulfate is a glycosaminoglycan and a part of the insoluble IPM skeleton. The identity and role of the F22 antigen is not known. However, it is a 250 kDa protein localized to specific extracellular compartments such as teh IPM. PNA is a lectin with a high binding affinity for D-galactose-beta (1-3) N-acetyl-D-galactosamine disaccharide linkages and binds to IPM domains surrounding cones, but not rods. The transplants (15-day-old embryonic rabbit retina) were placed between the neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium in adult hosts. The transplants developed the typical rosette formations with photoreceptors toward the center. IRBP labeling was distinct in the IPM in the host retina. However, no IRBP labeling could be detected in the transplants. The chondroitin-6-sulfate and F22 antibodies strongly labeled the IPM in the host retina and corresponding structures in the center of rosettes. A cone-specific labeling with PNA could be seen in the host retina. In the transplants, however, PNA labeling appeared in association with many more photoreceptors than in the host retina. There is no previous study available on the IPM in retinal cell transplants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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