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Internet Use in Relation to Overweight and Obesity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cross-Sectional Studies.

Authors
  • Aghasi, Mohadeseh1, 2
  • Matinfar, Ahmadreza2
  • Golzarand, Mahdieh3
  • Salari-Moghaddam, Asma1, 4
  • Ebrahimpour-Koujan, Soraiya1
  • 1 Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. , (Iran)
  • 2 Sayesar-e-Omid Research and Counseling Center, Tehran, Iran. , (Iran)
  • 3 Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. , (Iran)
  • 4 Students' Scientific Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. , (Iran)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.)
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2020
Volume
11
Issue
2
Pages
349–356
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmz073
PMID: 31386144
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Although several studies have investigated the association between Internet use and odds of overweight and obesity, results are inconsistent. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to summarize evidence on the association between Internet use and odds of overweight and obesity. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar up to February 2019 to identify relevant publications. Finally, 9 cross-sectional studies were considered in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Combining 11 effect sizes from 9 studies, we found a significant, positive association between the highest Internet use, compared to the lowest (ranged from ≥5 h/d to no use among studies), and odds of overweight and obesity (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.21-1.78; I2, 69.6%; P < 0.001), such that Internet users had 47% greater odds of being overweight or obese. We also observed a significant, positive association between the highest Internet use, compared to the lowest (ranged from ≥5 h/d to no use among studies), and overweight/obesity (OR: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06-1.25; I2, 0.0%; P = 0.426), obesity (OR: 2.58; 95% CI: 1.88-3.54; I2, 0.0%; P = 0.637), and overweight (OR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.16-1.64; I2, 13.1%; P = 0.330). A linear dose-response meta-analysis revealed that each additional 1 h/d of Internet use was associated with 8% increased odds of overweight and obesity (OR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05-1.11; I2, 3.8%; P = 0.403). Findings of this systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that Internet use was positively associated with increased odds of being overweight and obese. Copyright © American Society for Nutrition 2019.

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