Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Internet of things issues related to psychiatry

Authors
  • Monteith, Scott1
  • Glenn, Tasha2
  • Geddes, John3
  • Severus, Emanuel4
  • Whybrow, Peter C.5
  • Bauer, Michael4
  • 1 Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Traverse City Campus, Traverse City, MI, USA , Traverse City (United States)
  • 2 ChronoRecord Association, Fullerton, CA, USA , Fullerton (United States)
  • 3 University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK , Oxford (United Kingdom)
  • 4 University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus Medical Faculty, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, Dresden, 01307, Germany , Dresden (Germany)
  • 5 University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA, USA , Los Angeles (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Bipolar Disorders
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Apr 02, 2021
Volume
9
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s40345-020-00216-y
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundInternet of Things (IoT) devices for remote monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment are widely viewed as an important future direction for medicine, including for bipolar disorder and other mental illness. The number of smart, connected devices is expanding rapidly. IoT devices are being introduced in all aspects of everyday life, including devices in the home and wearables on the body. IoT devices are increasingly used in psychiatric research, and in the future may help to detect emotional reactions, mood states, stress, and cognitive abilities. This narrative review discusses some of the important fundamental issues related to the rapid growth of IoT devices.Main bodyArticles were searched between December 2019 and February 2020. Topics discussed include background on the growth of IoT, the security, safety and privacy issues related to IoT devices, and the new roles in the IoT economy for manufacturers, patients, and healthcare organizations.ConclusionsThe use of IoT devices will increase throughout psychiatry. The scale, complexity and passive nature of data collection with IoT devices presents unique challenges related to security, privacy and personal safety. While the IoT offers many potential benefits, there are risks associated with IoT devices, and from the connectivity between patients, healthcare providers, and device makers. Security, privacy and personal safety issues related to IoT devices are changing the roles of manufacturers, patients, physicians and healthcare IT organizations. Effective and safe use of IoT devices in psychiatry requires an understanding of these changes.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times