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Intercomparison of three modeling approaches for traffic-related road dust resuspension using two experimental data

Authors
  • Thouron, Laëtitia
  • Seigneur, Christian
  • Kim, Youngseob
  • MAHE, Frédéric
  • Andre, Michel
  • LEJRI, Delphine
  • VILLEGAS, Daniel
  • Bruge, Benjamin
  • CHANUT, Hervé
  • PELLAN, Yann
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2018
Source
HAL-UPMC
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown
External links

Abstract

Two observational campaigns were conducted, one in the Grenoble area (South Eastern France), for the MOCoPo project, near an urban freeway in 2011 and the other one in a Paris suburb, forthe TrafiPollu project, on a major surface street in 2014. PM10 concentrations were measured by Air Rhône-Alpes during the last 10 days of September 2011 for MOCoPo and by Airparif during 3 months from April to June 2014 for TrafiPollu. It has been shown that abrasion and resuspension processes represent a significant part of the total primary PM10 emissions of road traffic. Hereby, resuspended emissions originating from the road are estimated with several approaches and compared to PM10 measurements. We consider two different models available in the literature: HERMES (Pay et al., 2010) and NORTRIP (Denby et al., 2013), which differ in terms of formulation. We also apply an empirical method developed by Thorpe et al. (2007), based on near-road and background pollutant observations. The results vary depending on the traffic conditions and the modeling approach. In all cases, the resuspension emissions simulated are high enough to be considered in air quality modeling (ranging from 9 to 150% of the exhaust emissions). Those resuspension models were combined with atmospheric dispersion models to estimate near-road concentrations. We used a Gaussian line-source model for the Grenoble urban freeway and a street-canyon model (MUNICH) for the Paris suburban boulevard. The contribution of resuspension to traffic-related concentrations is hidden by a strong background contribution, which prevents us from concluding in terms of model performance. Nevertheless, a comparison with another dataset obtained near an urban freeway in Paris suggests that vehicle speed should be taken into account when estimating PM10 resuspension emissions.

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