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Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 is critical for activation of CD28-deficient T cells.

Authors
  • Gaglia, J L
  • Greenfield, E A
  • Mattoo, A
  • Sharpe, A H
  • Freeman, G J
  • Kuchroo, V K
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2000
Volume
165
Issue
11
Pages
6091–6098
Identifiers
PMID: 11086041
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Presentation of Ag to T lymphocytes in the absence of the requisite costimulatory signals leads to an Ag-specific unresponsiveness termed anergy, whereas Ag presentation in conjunction with costimulation leads to clonal expansion. B7/CD28 signaling has been shown to provide this critical costimulatory signal and blockade of this pathway may inhibit in vitro and in vivo immune responses. Although T cells from CD28-deficient mice are lacking in a variety of responses, they nonetheless are capable of various primary and secondary responses without the induction of anergy expected in the absence of costimulation. This suggests that there may be alternative costimulatory pathways that can replace CD28 signaling under certain circumstances. In this paper, we show that ICAM-1becomes a dominant costimulatory molecule for CD28-deficient T cells. ICAM-1 costimulates anti-CD3-mediated T cell proliferation and IL-2 secretion in CD28-deficient murine T cells. Furthermore, splenocytes from ICAM-1-deficient mice could not activate CD28-deficient T cells and splenocytes lacking both ICAM and CD28 fail to proliferate in response to anti-CD3-induced T cell signals. This confirms that not only can ICAM-1 act as a CD28-independent costimulator, but it is the dominant, requisite costimulatory molecule for the activation of T cells in the absence of B7/CD28 costimulation.

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