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Interactive effects of elevated homocysteine and late-life depression on cognitive impairment.

Authors
  • Zhou, Huarong1
  • Zhong, Xiaomei1
  • Chen, Ben1
  • Wu, Zhangying1
  • Zhang, Min1
  • Mai, Naikeng1
  • Peng, Qi1
  • Chen, Xinru1
  • Ouyang, Cong1
  • Liang, Wanyuan1
  • Dai, Chunying1
  • Huang, Xingxiao1
  • Zhang, Weiru1
  • Ning, Yuping2
  • 1 The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Mingxin Road #36, Liwan District, Guangzhou 510370, China; The first School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. , (China)
  • 2 The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Mingxin Road #36, Liwan District, Guangzhou 510370, China; The first School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; Guangdong Engineering Technology Research Center for Translational Medicine of Mental Disorders, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of affective disorders
Publication Date
Aug 15, 2020
Volume
277
Pages
212–217
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2020.08.022
PMID: 32829197
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Both an elevated homocysteine (Hcy) level and depression are risk factors for cognitive impairment in the general population, but no study has analyzed whether the coexistence of an elevated Hcy level and late-life depression (LLD) is associated with worse cognitive performance. We aimed to investigate the relationship between Hcy levels and cognitive function in individuals with LLD and whether the coexistence of an elevated Hcy level and LLD is associated with worse cognitive performance. A total of 113 LLD patients and 89 normal controls underwent a standardized clinical interview and comprehensive neuropsychological assessment battery. Plasma concentrations of Hcy were detected. Factorial analyses were performed to examine the impact of the coexistence of an elevated Hcy level and LLD on cognitive performance. Plasma Hcy levels in patients with LLD were significantly higher than that in normal controls. Only for LLD patients, Hcy level was negatively correlated with global cognition, executive function, attention, and visual space. The factorial analysis showed that there was a significant interactive effect of Hcy level (normal and elevated levels) and LLD (with and without LLD) on global cognition. In post hoc comparisons, the elderly individuals with both elevated Hcy levels and LLD tended to have the worst global cognitive function compared with those with LLD or elevated Hcy levels alone. The coexistence of an elevated Hcy level and LLD was associated with worse cognitive performance. Early intervention should be initiated to protect cognition in LLD patients with elevated Hcy levels. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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