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Interactive cell modeling web-resource, iCell, as a simulation-based teaching and learning tool to supplement electrophysiology education.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of biomedical engineering
Publication Date
Volume
34
Issue
7
Pages
1077–1087
Identifiers
PMID: 16794875
Source
Medline

Abstract

An interactive cell modeling web site, iCell (http://ssd1.bme.memphis.edu/icell/), that integrates research and education, was developed to present and to disseminate JAVA-coded models of cellular activities, and to supplement physiology education. iCell can be used to supplement the text-book material as a simulation-based teaching and learning tool. Specifically, iCell allows the students to supplement their learning experiences of the text-book cellular physiology material by running simulations in an interactive environment. The site consists of JAVA-coded models of various cardiac cells and neurons, and provides simulation data of their bioelectric transport activities at cellular level. Each JAVA-coded model allows the user to go through menu options to change model parameters, run and view simulation results. The site also has a glossary section for the scientific terms. iCell has been used as a teaching and learning tool for seven graduate courses at the Joint Biomedical Engineering Program of University of Memphis and University of Tennessee. This modeling tool was also used as a collaboration site among our physiology colleagues interested in simulations of cell membrane activities. Scientists from the fields of biosciences, engineering, life sciences and medical sciences in 17 countries have tested and utilized iCell as a simulation-based teaching, learning and collaboration environment. iCell provides us with an interactive, platform-independent, and user-friendly teaching and learning resource, and also a collaboration environment for electrophysiology to be shared over the Internet. The usage of simulations for teaching and learning will continue advancing simulation-based engineering and sciences for research and development.

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