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Interaction profiling methods to map protein and pathway targets of bioactive ligands.

Authors
  • Huang, Jun X1
  • Coukos, John S1
  • Moellering, Raymond E2
  • 1 Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA; Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.
  • 2 Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA; Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current opinion in chemical biology
Publication Date
Mar 05, 2020
Volume
54
Pages
76–84
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.cbpa.2020.02.001
PMID: 32146330
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Recent advances in -omic profiling technologies have ushered in an era where we no longer want to merely measure the presence or absence of a biomolecule of interest, but instead hope to understand its function and interactions within larger signaling networks. Here, we review several emerging proteomic technologies capable of detecting protein interaction networks in live cells and their integration to draft holistic maps of proteins that respond to diverse stimuli, including bioactive small molecules. Moreover, we provide a conceptual framework to combine so-called 'top-down' and 'bottom-up' interaction profiling methods and ensuing proteomic profiles to directly identify binding targets of small molecule ligands, as well as for unbiased discovery of proteins and pathways that may be directly bound or influenced by those first responders. The integrated, interaction-based profiling methods discussed here have the potential to provide a unique and dynamic view into cellular signaling networks for both basic and translational biological studies. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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