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An interaction model for the role of self-evaluations and antagonistic pursuits in subjective well-being.

Authors
  • Richardson, Kyle1
  • Hart, William1
  • Tortoriello, Gregory K1
  • Breeden, Christopher J1
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
British journal of psychology (London, England : 1953)
Publication Date
May 01, 2021
Volume
112
Issue
2
Pages
493–518
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/bjop.12473
PMID: 32981053
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Popular theorizing about happiness pursuit emphasizes universal paths to happiness, but other theorizing acknowledges different people achieve happiness in different ways (i.e., subjective well-being, SWB). The present work extended this latter perspective by examining how antagonistic pursuit of a grandiose identity ('narcissistic antagonism') - generally thought to reduce narcissistic people's SWB - may relate to increased cognitive well-being (i.e., a component of SWB) for narcissistic people with lower self-esteem. In Study 1, participants (N = 417) reported their narcissism, self-esteem, narcissistic antagonism, and general life satisfaction (to index cognitive well-being). In Study 2 (pre-registered), participants (N = 450) reported their narcissism, self-esteem, narcissistic antagonism, general and domain-specific life satisfaction, and general affect (to index affective well-being, which is a different component of SWB). Both studies revealed narcissistic antagonism related to increased life satisfaction only for more (vs. less) narcissistic people with lower (vs. higher) self-esteem. Study 2 not only replicated this interactive pattern on satisfaction across various life domains but also revealed the interaction may be related to increased negative affect. Broadly, results highlight how different people may enhance features of SWB in different, even 'dark', ways. © 2020 British Psychological Society.

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