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The Interaction between Dietary Selenium Intake and Genetics in Determining Cancer Risk and Outcome

Authors
  • Kadkol, Shrinidhi
  • Diamond, Alan M.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutrients
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Aug 12, 2020
Volume
12
Issue
8
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/nu12082424
PMID: 32806741
PMCID: PMC7468715
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Review
License
Green

Abstract

There is considerable interest in the trace element selenium as a possible cancer chemopreventive dietary component, but supplementation trials have not indicated a clear benefit. Selenium is a critical component of selenium-containing proteins, or selenoproteins. Members of this protein family contain selenium in the form of selenocysteine. Selenocysteine is encoded by an in-frame UGA codon recognized as a selenocysteine codon by a regulatory element, the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS), in the 3′-untranslated region of selenoprotein mRNAs. Epidemiological studies have implicated several selenoprotein genes in cancer risk or outcome based on associations between allelic variations and disease risk or mortality. These polymorphisms can be found in or near the SECIS or in the selenoprotein coding sequence. These variations both function to control protein synthesis and impact the efficiency of protein synthesis in response to the levels of available selenium. Thus, an individual’s genetic makeup and nutritional intake of selenium may interact to predispose them to acquiring cancer or affect cancer progression to lethality.

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