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Intentional Supernumerary Motor Phantom Limb after Right Cerebral Stroke: A Case Report

Authors
  • Yamada, Mai
  • Sasahara, Yoshimi
  • Seto, Makiko
  • Satoh, Akira
  • Tsujihata, Mitsuhiro
Type
Published Article
Journal
Case Reports in Neurology
Publisher
S. Karger AG
Publication Date
Apr 26, 2021
Volume
13
Issue
1
Pages
251–258
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1159/000513302
Source
Karger
Keywords
License
Green
External links

Abstract

A 47-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital for rehabilitation after right basal ganglion hematoma. On day 57, he noticed a supernumerary motor phantom limb (SPL) involving his right arm, originating at the level of the elbow. The most notable finding of his SPL was the motor characteristic. When the subject had the intention to move the upper paralyzed limb simultaneously with the trainer’s facilitating action, he said “there is another arm.” The intention to move the paralyzed arm alone or passive movement of the paralyzed arm did not induce the SPL. He showed a severe left sensorimotor impairment and mild hemineglect, but no neglect syndromes of the body (e.g., asomatognosia, somatoparaphrenia, personification and misoplegia, or anosognosia) were observed. Brain MRI demonstrated a hematoma in the right temporal lobe subcortex, subfrontal cortex, putamen, internal capsule, and thalamus. Single-photon emission computed tomography images showed more widespread hypoperfusion in the right hemisphere in comparison to the lesions on MRI. However, the premotor cortex was preserved. Our case is different from Staub’s case in that SPL was not induced by the intention to move the paralyzed limb alone; rather, it was induced when the patient intended to move the paralyzed limb with a trainer’s simultaneous facilitating action. The SPL may reflect that an abnormal closed-loop function of the thalamocortical system underlies the phantom phenomenon. However, despite the severe motor and sensory impairment, the afferent pathway from the periphery to the premotor cortex may have been partially preserved, and this may have been related to the induction of SPL.

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