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The intensity of the pupillary light reflex does not correlate with the number of retinal photoreceptor cells.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Experimental neurology
Publication Date
Volume
133
Issue
1
Pages
43–49
Identifiers
PMID: 7601262
Source
Medline

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if the pupillary light reflex (PLR) can serve as an indicator of the number of photoreceptor cells present in the rat retina to a sufficient degree of precision to be useful for testing the functional effects of retinal transplantation. The PLR was measured as percentage constriction of normal Fischer 344 rats (n = 14) and compared to the PLR of light-damaged (1300 luxes/30 days exposure) Fischer rats (n = 13). Additionally, the PLR of RCS-rdy+ (congenic) rats (n = 8) was compared to the PLR or RCS dystrophic rats (n = 7). Three eyes from each group were randomly chosen for morphometry. The number of photoreceptor nuclear profiles per 60 microns of retinal length was counted at six predetermined loci and averaged. The mean PLR of Light-Damaged F344 group (64%) was significantly different from the mean PLR of the Normal F344 group (75%) (P = 0.003). However, the mean PLR of the RCS Dystrophic group (72%) did not differ from the mean PLR of the RCS Congenic group (71%) (P = 0.82). Morphometry revealed that the mean number of photoreceptor nuclear profiles within each group of animals was vastly different: Normal F344 = 138, Light Damaged F344 = 19, Congenic RCS = 93, and Dystrophic RCS = 1. No correlation was found between intensity of PLR and number of photoreceptors present (r = 0.11, P = 0.78).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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