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An integrated metabolic and transcriptomic analysis reveals the mechanism through which fruit bagging alleviates exocarp semi-russeting in pear fruit.

Authors
  • Zhang, Jing1
  • Zhang, Yi-Fan1
  • Zhang, Peng-Fei1
  • Bian, Yue-Hong1
  • Liu, Zi-Yu1
  • Zhang, Chen1
  • Liu, Xiao1
  • Wang, Chun-Lei1
  • 1 School of Horticulture and Plant Protection, International Research Laboratory of Agriculture and Agri-Product Safety, Key Laboratory of Plant Functional Genomics of the Ministry of Education, Yangzhou University, 48 Wenhui East Road, Yangzhou 225009, People's Republic of China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Tree Physiology
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Jul 05, 2021
Volume
41
Issue
7
Pages
1306–1318
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/treephys/tpaa172
PMID: 33367887
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Fruit semi-russeting is an undesirable quality trait that occurs in fruit production. It is reported that preharvest fruit bagging could effectively alleviate fruit exocarp semi-russeting, but the physiological and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we performed an in-depth investigation into pear fruit semi-russeting from morphologic, metabolic and transcriptomic perspectives by comparing control (semi-russeted) and bagged (non-russeted) 'Cuiguan' pear fruits. The results showed that significant changes in cutin and suberin resulted in pear fruit semi-russeting. Compared with the skin of bagged fruits, the skin of the control fruits presented reduced cutin contents accompanied by an accumulation of suberin, which resulted in fruit semi-russeting; α, ω-dicarboxylic acids accounted for the largest proportion of typical suberin monomers. Moreover, combined transcriptomic and metabolic analysis revealed a series of genes involved in cutin and suberin biosynthesis, transport and polymerization differentially expressed between the two groups. Furthermore, the expression levels of genes involved in the stress response and in hormone biosynthesis and signaling were significantly altered in fruits with contrasting phenotypes. Finally, a number of transcription factors, including those of the MYB, NAC, bHLH and bZIP families, were differentially expressed. Taken together, the results suggest that the multilayered mechanism through which bagging alleviates pear fruit semi-russeting is complex, and the large number of candidate genes identified provides a good foundation for future functional studies. © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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